Excerpt From Medical Ethics: Real-World Application By Afshin Nasser

Gifts

AMA medical ethics II stipulates gifts to Physicians from any industry creates conditions that carry the risk of subtly biasing—or being perceived to bias—professional judgment in the care of patients.

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AMA medical ethics II stipulates gifts to Physicians from any industry creates conditions that carry the risk of subtly biasing—or being perceived to bias—professional judgment in the care of patients.

To preserve the trust that is fundamental to the patient-physician relationship and public confidence in the profession, physicians should:
(a) Decline cash gifts in any amount from an entity that has a direct interest in physicians’ treatment recommendations.
(b) Decline any gifts for which reciprocity is expected or implied.
(c) Accept an in-kind gift for the physician’s practice only when the gift will directly benefit patients, including patient education, and is of minimal value
(d) Academic institutions and residency and fellowship programs may accept special funding on behalf of trainees to support medical students’, residents’, and fellows’ participation in professional meetings, including educational meetings, provided:
The program identifies recipients based on independent institutional criteria
Funds are distributed to recipients without specific attribution to sponsors.

Gifts from Patients
Small gifts from patients of modest value are acceptable on the part of the physician, if there is no expectation of a different form of therapy, or a higher level of care.
Cakes and cookies for Christmas, a birthday card or balloon on a birthday, or other tokens of gratitude are acceptable.

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State Medical Boards

The medical board’s duty is to protect the public, not the physician. State medical boards today focus on licensed physicians who violate professional ethics, and their mandate has significantly evolved to focus on disciplining physicians.

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Boundary Violation

Boundaries create a therapeutic distance between physician and patient and clarify their respective roles and expectations. Boundaries define limits of the therapeutic relationship.

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Medical Ethics: Real-World Application By Afshin Nasser

You may have acquired this book as a result of conflicts with peers, administrators, patients, or State Medical Boards, where the outcomes of those interactions have left you wondering, “…what if I had done things differently?”

In that case, I hope that this book answers some of your questions and guides you with regards to any future quandaries you may encounter.


If you are a healthcare worker seeking to understand the subject of medical ethics, then I hope this book helps you acquire the clarity you seek.
If you are an individual simply curious about medical ethics, then I raise my hat to you for your pursuit of knowledge.