Excerpt From Medical Ethics: Real-World Application By Afshin Nasser

Managed Care

The term “managed care is” used in the United States to describe activities intended to reduce the cost of providing for-profit healthcare and provide health insurance while improving the quality of that care. Managed care plans are a type of health insurance, which include contracts with healthcare providers, medical facilities, and physicians to provide care for their members at reduced costs. These providers make up the plan's network, and how much of the care provided is paid for by the plan, depends on the network's rules.

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The term “managed care is” used in the United States to describe activities intended to reduce the cost of providing for-profit healthcare and provide health insurance while improving the quality of that care. Managed care plans are a type of health insurance, which include contracts with healthcare providers, medical facilities, and physicians to provide care for their members at reduced costs. These providers make up the plan’s network, and how much of the care provided is paid for by the plan, depends on the network’s rules.

Plans that restrict choices usually cost less, while more flexible plans cost more. There are three types of managed care plans:
●  Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO) generally pay for care within a set network of physicians. The patient chooses a primary care doctor who coordinates most of his/her care.
●  Preferred Provider Organizations (PPO) usually pay more of the cost of care if the care is within the network. PPOs still pay part of the cost if the care is outside of the network.
●  Point of Service (POS) plans allow the patient to choose between an HMO or a PPO model each time care is needed.

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State Medical Boards

The medical board’s duty is to protect the public, not the physician. State medical boards today focus on licensed physicians who violate professional ethics, and their mandate has significantly evolved to focus on disciplining physicians.

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Boundary Violation

Boundaries create a therapeutic distance between physician and patient and clarify their respective roles and expectations. Boundaries define limits of the therapeutic relationship.

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Medical Ethics: Real-World Application By Afshin Nasser

You may have acquired this book as a result of conflicts with peers, administrators, patients, or State Medical Boards, where the outcomes of those interactions have left you wondering, “…what if I had done things differently?”

In that case, I hope that this book answers some of your questions and guides you with regards to any future quandaries you may encounter.


If you are a healthcare worker seeking to understand the subject of medical ethics, then I hope this book helps you acquire the clarity you seek.
If you are an individual simply curious about medical ethics, then I raise my hat to you for your pursuit of knowledge.